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YES! Well, actually, no. While it’s not strictly necessary, it is important to have an awareness of your SEI strengths and weaknesses as you work with your child. It’s just logical a person will more effectively teach and reinforce behavior they’ve already mastered. If you’re especially strong in a skill, you’ll probably be alert to whether or not the children you’re working with need to grow in that area.

However, what if you’re low in an area? What if the skill you’re low in is Personal Power? That trait includes having a strong sense of the authority we’ve been given as Believers. If you’re low in that area, chances are you’re not going to notice whether or not the children you’re working with are also low in that area. And if you do notice, would you feel competent to authentically build their sense of Personal Power when you don’t really believe it for yourself? People who are low in understanding or belief in this trait usually lack confidence or the ability to be appropriately assertive. Those traits are needed to withstand peer-pressure—something we definitely want for our kids.

As another example, think of an adult who scores low in Conflict Management and avoids it like the plague. That adult might be able to discuss Conflict Management with a child but they won’t be able to model it or effectively support and reinforce the child learning the skill of addressing conflict. The adult simply lacks the awareness and the skills to do so.

For instance, when I took the assessment, I was surprised to learn my score in social-awareness was higher than my score in self-awareness. While my overall SEI score was high, the report showed I was actually more skilled in relationships than in knowing my own strengths.  That’s the first area I worked on—knowing my strengths.

Research indicates children with high SEI have better attitudes about self, others, and school with fewer issues with conduct and aggressive behavior. They score higher on achievement tests and have less emotional distress. (www.6seconds.org)

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